Tuesday, November 15, 2005

Khan Goes to Court

Over here you can listen to a recent report by RBM on conflict between military recruiters and college students, broadcast by WAMU 88.5 FM in Washington. An excerpt from the lede:
You've heard the stories: military recruiters for the all-volunteer armed forces are having trouble meeting their quotas. They're trying hard to attract young people - particularly students looking for a career. But not all students are eager to talk to a military recruiter. Case-in-point: an undergrad at George Mason University who's encouraging other students NOT to sign on the dotted line, and who's now in legal trouble because of it. He could face charges of trespassing and disorderly conduct next week in Fairfax after he handed out pamphlets that surged young people not to join the military. It's a legal issue that's drawing a lot of attention, as we hear from reporter Raul Moreno.

Monday, August 01, 2005

"He Was More than Just One Soldier": Narrating National Identiy in Small-town America

Update: RBM's revised 2005 Master's thesis, an ethnography of wartime in Palouse, Washington, is now available via Google Docs. It was presented to the 2004 conference of the Northwest Communication Association in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.

The original text is available online at the library of Washington State University.

Sunday, May 01, 2005

Mountain Climbers



Update: an essay by RBM about a father and son's attempt to climb Mount Rainier, the most heavily glaciated peak in the continental United States, is now available via Google Docs. It was published in the 2005 edition of LandEscapes, a literary journal of the Washington State University English Department.

Reaching the Far Side

A column by RBM that appears this spring in The Murrow Communicator, a publication of Washington State University's Edward R. Murrow School of Journalism, is now online. An excerpt:
A dozen shivering young landlubbers stood around the shallow end, clutching paddleboards and trying to ignore parents waving encouragement from the second floor balcony (to my dismay, Mom assured me she would leap to my rescue, tennis shoes and all, if I started to sink). Chlorine wafted off the turquoise depths, making me slightly woozy. Then the roll call from Ron, a jovial, pot-bellied fortysomething with a jaguar tattoo on his backside.